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December 2011. Action in the township of Alexandra in Johannesburg, South Africa. Beautiful !!!


visit on FACEBOOK. GET INSPIRED! A large-scale participatory art project that transforms messages of personal identity into pieces of artistic work. A collaboration between the artist JR, the TED Prize and you!

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I was recently contacted by a fella named Arnoldo Hurtado Escobar about shooting a commissioned concept for him. Arnoldo is a a painter who recently graduated from UNT and who will soon be moving to Cambodia for two years to learn more about life and serving others. He wanted to shoot a take on “one of the most intriguing biblical mythologies” – the story of Adam and Eve as found in the bible.

After talking it over we decided to approach it together. One of the points within that really interested us was the idea that a creator would turn its back on its creations for proving themselves to be faulty, broken and human… just as it had created them to be. It seems like a lot of people’s fear and/or doubt of God and even the existence of God are an unfortunate byproduct of such teachings. The other point of interest was the entrance of “evil” as something that came from outside of us, a spiritual principality and even boogeyman that we should all watch out for because it may incite us to do wrong.

We both felt that most of our problems in life were of our own making and came from within ourselves. The idea of personal responsibility. Having said that, we didn’t have any desire to refute anyone’s beliefs or minimize a story or book that contains beautiful teachings and does so much for so many. Just wanted to kick the ideas around.

When all was said and done, we ended up with something more portrait than concept and found the idea difficult to translate properly, but the ideas were still implied. I posted one of them on Facebook and unfortunately it was reported and deleted within a few hours. I was pretty disappointed because I felt both the image and the accompanying words were tasteful, unoffensive and couldn’t be classified as containing nudity. I was given a seven day photo uploading restriction which is pretty inconvenient because I use Facebook in conjunction with my website and blog to share all I shoot with the masses.

I am at least thankful I could share this here though and I hope you all enjoy it. Be well and happy shooting, my friends.

Dylan Hollingsworth
July 12, 2011

Arnoldo Hurtado Escobar and Vanessa Ruiz ©DylanHollingsworth

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“Twins” 1988 ©Toni Parks.
By SUSAN HODARA for the NYT
Published: January 28, 2011
NEW ROCHELLE, N.Y.
IN Gordon Parks’s 1942 photograph “American Gothic — Washington, D.C.,” a grim-faced cleaning woman in a well-worn polka-dot dress stands against the backdrop of an American flag. With a broom in one hand and a mop beside her, she stares directly at the camera.

In “Twins,” shot 46 years later by Mr. Parks’s daughter, Toni Parks, two equally unsmiling young girls wear frilly headdresses and festive tops. They, too, gaze straight into the lens.

These images and more are currently on view in “Bridging the Gap: Photography by Gordon Parks and Toni Parks,” at the Castle Gallery at the College of New Rochelle. Curated by Katrina Rhein, the gallery’s director, the show is the first two-person exhibition featuring the father-daughter pair. It presents nearly 70 pieces from the college’s collection, including photographs spanning seven decades and an assortment of books and videos by and about the artists.

The relationship between the Parkses and the College of New Rochelle dates back 20 years. In 1991, in recognition of Mr. Parks’s work, the school opened the Gordon A. Parks Gallery and Cultural Arts Center on its campus in the South Bronx; in 1992, it granted Mr. Parks an honorary degree. At the time, Ms. Parks was working at the college as both a counselor for adults returning to school and a photographer during graduations. She has since curated exhibitions at the Gordon A. Parks Gallery, and shown her work there on several occasions, most recently in a solo exhibition in 2009.

But exhibiting at the Castle Gallery, as well as showing her work alongside her father’s, remained unfulfilled goals until now. “This is a dream come true,” Ms. Parks said at the show’s opening in December.

Given the photographers’ familial relationship, gallery visitors might find themselves focusing on the parallels among the works rather than appreciating the individual images. But, Ms. Rhein said, “Each piece in this exhibition stands on its own. I believe there are as many dissimilarities as there are similarities.”

“Gordon was a mentor to Toni, schooling her on life and the arts, ” she said, but they had “different processes for seeking out subjects and creating works.”

Mr. Parks’s many accomplishments include directing the film adaptation of his autobiographical novel, “The Learning Tree,” in 1969, and the blaxploitation film “Shaft” in 1971; writing memoirs, novels and books of poetry; performing as a jazz pianist; and composing orchestral scores. But he was most prolific as a photographer. He was the first African-American to work for Vogue and Life magazines, with subjects ranging from well-known actors and entertainers to victims of abject poverty in the United States and abroad.

Both ends of this spectrum are represented here in 10 black-and-white photographs, which Mr. Parks donated to the college in 1991. Among them are highlights from his 20-year stint at Life, including “Red Jackson, Harlem,” part of his first assignment for the magazine, a photo essay shot in 1948 about the Midtowners gang; and “Bessie Fontenelle and Children at Welfare Office,” part of another photo essay, this one from 1968, taken during a monthlong stay in the Fontenelle family’s Harlem tenement. Then there’s Muhammad Ali after his fight with Henry Cooper in 1966, his face glistening with beads of sweat, the intensity of his glare palpable.

The exhibition’s title, proposed by Ms. Parks, conveys multiple meanings. One suggests the gap that Mr. Parks, who died in 2006, referred to in his 2005 memoir, “A Hungry Heart,” between the primarily white audiences of his magazine photos and the residents of the ghettos where he often shot. Another reference recognizes Mr. Parks’s middle name, Alexander, making his initials, G.A.P. Finally, the exhibit bridges the work of Mr. Parks, who discovered his photographic calling early in life, and Ms. Parks, who said she did not pick up a camera until she was in her 40s.

Given her father’s accomplishments and reputation, Ms. Parks’s avoidance of the field was understandable. “Of course he was intimidating!” she said. “That’s why it took me so long.”

A tall, slender woman with silver hair that falls past her shoulders, Ms. Parks, 70, was raised in White Plains, where she studied piano and musical composition; she currently lives in England. As soon as she started shooting, she said, she knew she had found her passion. She recalled presenting an early contact sheet to her father and telling him, “I don’t care what you say — this is me!”

The “me” that is on display in “Bridging the Gap” includes a dozen color shots of a dress rehearsal of “Martin: A Tribute to Martin Luther King Jr.,” the five-movement ballet re-enacting Dr. King’s life that Mr. Parks wrote, scored and helped to choreograph, and that he later directed and narrated as a film. “It was my first professional assignment,” Ms. Parks said. “Martin” aired in 1990 on PBS on what would have been Dr. King’s birthday.

The exhibition also contains images taken by Ms. Parks in Manhattan between 1986 and 1993: black-and-white portraits and street scenes, and several Cibachrome prints, including an urban sunset and moonrise. “In New York, there are so many types of people and so many things happening within one block,” said Ms. Parks, who is a member of Kamoinge, a collective of African-American photographers founded in 1963 and based in New York. “Whatever I see that delights me, I take the photograph.”

“Bridging the Gap: Photography by Gordon Parks and Toni Parks” runs through Feb. 20 at the Castle Gallery at the College of New Rochelle, 29 Castle Place, New Rochelle. Six of Mr. Parks’s feature films will be screened in the gallery on Tuesdays and Wednesdays, 6 to 8 p.m., Feb. 1, 2, 8, 9, 15 and 16. For a schedule of films, gallery hours and more information: cnr.edu/cg or (914) 654-5423.

we hope you will make plans to join us at Eno’s next Thursday night as we share some of our more recent photo work.

Love & Photographs,
the As

The 3rd installment of CRAVE is coming soon and we’re joining forces with GO OAK CLIFF to bring you Blues, Bandits & Barbecue – a neighborhood competition extravaganza and BBQ-OFF that is sure to be a spicy delicious good time. You don’t want to miss it!
and ARTISTS:
we want to put your Art in front of an audience of hundreds. (if you were at Bastille on Bishop, you know what we mean and you know the folks over at Go Oak Cliff really know how to throw a party)
submit today. Deadline is August 15th. Bring it!
submission form is HERE

©Ange Fitzgerald

we can't wait for the CRAVE COMEBACK!!!


Artists and Vendors submit HERE.
Musicians, send a link to your myspace or mp3s to info@photopolus.com.
DEADLINE: AUGUST 19

Details:
We are accepting submissions from all ARTISTS, inviting MUSICIANS to apply to the fest and also accepting applications from select ART VENDORS.

More than anything else, we are excited about this opportunity to celebrate our creative community on a regular basis and are very much looking forward to seeing YOU at the first show.

Artists:
Your $25 submission fee allows you to present for consideration to the CRAVE Jury up to 3 pieces / jpgs of your original work that you either currently have ready to show or plan to build out for the event.

Our jury reviews all work anonymously. That’s right, our jurors won’t have a clue whose work they are reviewing.

All mediums are accepted.

Don’t WAIT TO SUBMIT! Since this is a monthly exhibit, we will be accepting submissions through August 15, 2010 for the September show and through September 15 for the October show.
However, the sooner you submit, the sooner you could potentially showcase your work so don’t wait!

Artists! submit your applications here. All entries must include 1 to 3 jpgs at least 640 pixels wide.

Vendors and Musicians:
We are also accepting ten art vendors each month, who will be guaranteed a spot for $100.
*please note, if you purchase a vendor booth, you must be present (or have trained staff present) for the duration of the event to sell your work/products. If you wish to participate as a vendor or a band, please email info@photopolus.com. NOTE: Bands need only pay a $25 submission fee, and will be assigned a 30-40 minute time slot upon acceptance to the festival.

CRAVE Jury:
Andrew Tolentino
Ange Fitzgerald
Cara Michelle Smith
Cathey Miller
Clint Scism
Frank Lopez
Guy Reynolds
Havi Frost
Kevin Obregon
Lisa Lindholm
Mark Nelson
Robb Conover
Richard Ross
Sergio Garcia
Vanessa Neil

Note: 3-4 jurors will be assigned to each set of submissions per month and will rotate throughout the year.

Thanks so much and happy creating for CRAVE!
We can’t wait to see your stuff.

Love&Photographs,
The As

Artists and Vendors submit HERE.
Musicians, send a link to your myspace or mp3s to info@photopolus.com.
DEADLINE: APRIL 19

Details:
We are accepting submissions from all ARTISTS, inviting MUSICIANS to apply to the fest and also accepting applications from select ART VENDORS.

More than anything else, we are excited about this opportunity to celebrate our creative community on a regular basis and are very much looking forward to seeing YOU at the first show.

Artists:
The submission format has changed from last year’s OCAC. We will be featuring a monthly juried exhibition and OUTDOOR installation.

Your $25 submission fee allows you to present for consideration to the CRAVE Jury up to 3 pieces / jpgs of your original work that you either presently have ready to show or plan to build out for the festival.

Our jury reviews all work anonymously. That’s right, our jurors won’t have a clue whose work they are reviewing.

All mediums are accepted.

Since this is a monthly exhibit, we will be accepting submissions through June 15, 2010.
However, the sooner you submit, the sooner you could potentially showcase your work so don’t wait!

Submit your applications here. All entries must include 1 to 3 jpgs at least 640 pixels wide.

Vendors and Musicians:
We are also accepting ten art vendors each month, who will be guaranteed a spot for $100.
*please note, if you purchase a vendor booth, you must be present (or have trained staff present) for the duration of the event to sell your work/products. If you wish to participate as a vendor or a band, please email info@photopolus.com. NOTE: Bands need only pay a $25 submission fee, and will be assigned a 30 minute time slot upon acceptance to the festival.

CRAVE Jury:
Andrew Tolentino
Ange Fitzgerald
Cara Michelle Smith
Cathey Miller
Clint Scism
Frank Lopez
Guy Reynolds
Havi Frost
Kevin Obregon
Lisa Lindholm
Mark Nelson
Robb Conover
Richard Ross
Sergio Garcia
Vanessa Neil

Note: 3-4 jurors will be assigned to each set of submissions per month and will rotate throughout the year.

Thanks so much and happy creating for CRAVE!
We can’t wait to see your stuff.

Love&Photographs,
The A’s

Hey Camera Gangstas, this just in… the updated lineup for CRAVE on April 11th during the 2nd annual OAK CLIFF ART CRAWL includes Giggle Party and we couldn’t be happier or more excited.
add that to the mix of LOVIE, RTB2, Dave of THE FELONS, Clay Pendergrass, Anna Procter, Luna Matto, Drawn by Jaymz & Cocky Americans and good grief, we’ve got ourselves a helluva show, yo!
hope you’ve marked your calendar.
here are the brilliant ARTISTS who will be exhibiting some AMAZING work:
(we’re SO proud)
Chris Bingham
Cabe Booth
Can Turk
Dan Colcer
Delaney Allen
Eve Wada
George Wada
Joe Horner
Joshua Smith
Kelsey Foster
MJ Cardenas
Nicole Horn
Sundee Corley
Tanya Meuer
Wendy Wezensky

oh SNAP. it's gonna be a PARTY!

Don’t forget, you’ve only got 2 days left (until this Friday) to submit work to exhibit at the first installment of CRAVE at NOVA.
It’s going to be a BLAST and we’ve got some really cool stuff lined up for the 2nd Sunday in April, during the 2nd annual Oak Cliff Art Crawl so get your entries in today and we’ll see you there!

Our badass evaluation committee is as follows (and they can’t wait to see your work):
Andrew Tolentino
Ange Fitzgerald
Cara Michelle Smith
Cathey Miller
Clint Scism
Frank Lopez
Guy Reynolds
Havi Frost
Kevin Obregon
Lisa Lindholm
Mark Nelson
Robb Conover
Richard Ross
Sergio Garcia
Vanessa Neil
Note: 3-4 jurors will be assigned to each set of submissions per month and will rotate throughout the year.

Happy creating for CRAVE!
We absolutely can’t wait!

Hey! Save the date. Frank will be showing his ambrotypes in an exhibit at the Dallas Museum of Art Friday feb 19th from 7-9pm as part of the late nights @ the DMA. Everyone is welcome to attend. We’ll see you there!

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